What You Can Expect From Your Age-Related Macular Degeneration Surgery

You’ve gone through all of the tests and your  optometrist told you that you have age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Their recommendation is to have surgery to reduce any further vision damage. While this is a surgical procedure, it has become a common one done in the doctor’s office. Here is why this is an important procedure to have done and what you can expect.

Why This Surgery is Important

There is no cure for AMD, but surgery will prevent it from getting worse. If the progressive damage of AMD isn’t stopped, you could permanently lose part or all of your vision. Your doctor may have mentioned that you have one of two types of AMD. The exact surgical procedure used depends on the type you have:

Wet AMD – This is due to tiny blood vessels appearing on the retina. These vessels are weak and tend to leak fluid onto the retina, blocking the light from hitting it. Laser surgery is used to dry up these blood vessels, preventing them from leaking. This is the most common form of AMD.

Dry AMD – Small, crusty deposits (drusen) form on the retina and block the light. Laser surgery can be used to clear up some of the drusen, but it is not often done because it can increase the risk of you developing the wet form of AMD.

The Days Before Your Surgery

Arrange to have someone take you to your appointment and then back home. You won’t be able to drive for several hours after the surgery. Have a light meal the night before the surgery and get plenty of rest. This will help you relax during the procedure.

The Day of the Surgery

Once you check into the eye doctor’s office, you’ll be made comfortable in a reclining chair in the surgical area. Your doctor may offer you something to help you relax if you’re anxious about the procedure. They will then put anesthetic eye drops in the eye to be worked on and will dilate that pupil to make it easier for your doctor to see the retina.

A machine will move in front of your face that combines a microscope for looking into your eye and the laser. As your doctor looks at your eye, they will guide the laser along the tiny blood vessels that have developed on your retina. You will hear the machine as the laser pulses on and off, but you won’t feel anything in or around your eye.

After the procedure, you’ll relax in the waiting area for a few minutes to make sure you have no adverse reaction to the surgery. Once your doctor releases you, your friend or family member can take you home.

After the Surgery

For a few days after the procedure, you may have a slight ache in your eye that can be relieved with an over-the-counter pain medicine, such as ibuprofen. Your doctor will have you come in for a checkup to check on the results of the procedure. This surgery does not restore any vision you have already lost, but will prevent it from getting worse. You’ll be shown how to check your own vision progress so you can report any signs of further vision loss.

This laser surgery is not effective for everyone. If your doctor recommends it, it’s because they believe that it is the one way to keep your vision from getting worse. For more information, contact an experienced eye doctor like Dr. Harvey Mayers.

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Why You Need Physical Therapy After A Sports Injury

If you have recently experienced a sports injury, your doctor has probably brought up the idea of physical therapy. After you go through any necessary surgical procedures following the injury, the next best thing is to go through physical therapy. During physical therapy, you will perform certain exercises that help to improve your flexibility, mobility, and strength.

You will get help from a physiotherapist or physical therapist, or someone that is experienced in both practices. Here is more information about physical therapy following a sports injury:

It Helps to Improve Function Without Pain

The first way you benefit from physical therapy after a sports injury is by improving your body’s function without going through additional pain. Rehabilitation is difficult, no matter how severe your injury was or what type of surgical procedure you endured.

One of the difficult parts of it is that it can be painful when you start stretching and moving the affected muscles and joints. A physical therapist is trained at understanding your body’s deficiencies, and is able to work with you to improve your movements without causing more discomfort.

You Learn Essential Stretches

Stretching your muscles and joints is also important when it comes to getting better range of motion after an injury. This is likely provided by a physiotherapist, who is someone that specializes in flexibility and mobility with stretches and exercises. Stretching is typically the first stage of improving your flexibility and mobility after having surgery, or following your injury.

Your physiotherapist will start slow, moving the joints gradually as you start to regain better range of motion in those joints. This stretching comes in handy later when you start to strengthen and exercise your body.

Strength is Restored

Once you have been stretching your joints and muscles for a while, you will then start to restore your strength. Both physical therapists and physiotherapists are experienced at this stage of rehabilitation. They will start slow, gradually improving your strength by introducing different types of exercises.

Now that you have better range of motion, they will want to improve your endurance and help you to maintain the composure you have gained so far during treatment. Part of the strength exercises includes re-strengthening your core and getting better stability overall.

The hardest part about a sports injury is that you lose some of your momentum as you lie in bed. Instead of letting that get you down, contact a physiotherapist or physical therapist to start gaining your strength, flexibility, and mobility. As you do so, you will start regaining the confidence you need to make a full recovery.

To learn more, contact a company like Surrey Sports & Rehabilitation with any questions or concerns you have.

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5 Ways You Can Reduce Computer Eye Strain

If you work in an office, you likely have to stare at a computer screen often. Looking at a computer screen can lead to blurry vision, red eyes and even double vision. Luckily, there are several things you can do to reduce computer eye strain.

Reduce Glare

If there is a lot of glare around you, it can stress your eyes out even more. One of the best ways to reduce glare is to install an anti-glare screen on your computer monitor. You can also minimize glare by covering the windows with blinds or curtains. If outdoor light can’t get inside, you will have a much easier time looking at your computer screen.

Adjust Your Computer’s Brightness

Another way you can reduce eye strain is to adjust your computer’s brightness. If your computer screen is too bright, your eyes will get tired a lot more easily. Try looking at a website with a white background. If the background looks like a light source, it is definitely time to reduce the brightness settings.

Look Away from the Screen

If your job requires you to constantly focus on the computer screen, it can really tire out your eyes. To prevent your eyes from getting too tired, try to look away from the computer screen every 20 minutes for 20 seconds. This will relax your eyes and reduce fatigue.

Wear Computer Glasses

If you really want to reduce computer eye strain, you should definitely think about wearing computer glasses. These computer glasses will help you focus on your computer screen without straining your eyes. Although you can buy computer glasses at the store, you should get them from an optometrist to receive the full benefits.

Try Blinking More

Did you know that you tend to blink less often when you stare at a computer screen? Not blinking often enough can really dry out your eyes and cause irritation. To keep your eyes from drying out, try this exercise every 20 minutes: blink slowly, like you’re falling asleep, 10 times. This will moisture to your eyes and prevent them getting irritated.

If you frequently experience computer eye strain, you should definitely follow these helpful tips. Reducing eye strain will make your work day much more pleasant. Do not forget to visit your optometrist every year for a checkup. Your optometrist can examine your eyes and determine if they are affected by computer eye strain at all. Click here to learn more about this topic.

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Winter Driving Is A Pain In The Eyes: Sunglasses Can Help!

Driving in the wintertime can be a real pain in the eyes. The constantly changing weather and the glare from the snow can make it difficult for even the best drivers to see, and if you wear glasses, the issue is only compounded. Believe it or not, sunglasses can help, but you have to be careful to choose the right ones to meet your needs. Here is a closer look at some of the types available.

Polarized Sunglasses

If you do not wear glasses on a regular basis, a pair of polarized sunglasses can help you to see better in winter weather. They will protect your eyes from UV rays reflecting off of the snow, and will also enhance your vision in inclement weather. Just make sure that the lenses are lighter in color than ones that you would normally wear in the summer. This will allow more light into your eyes, making it easier for you to see on a cloudy winter day.

Prescription Sunglasses

If you have a fairly mild glasses prescription, or if you are only required to wear your glasses for driving, a pair of prescription sunglasses could be ideal for winter driving. Like their regular counterparts, prescription sunglasses can be polarized in order to improve your vision while driving. Choosing prescription sunglasses also allows you to change your look a bit while wearing them. If you are concerned with the bulkiness of trying to find a pair of regular sunglasses to fit over your glasses, these are a much cooler option.

Clip-on Sunglasses

If your prescription is fairly strong, or you are required to wear your glasses continually, clip-on sunglasses may be a better choice for you. These light-weight lenses are perfect for putting on and taking off quickly, and some versions even flip upward for a quick view through your glasses under them. Like other versions of sunglasses, these lenses can be polarized, but they can be of even more benefit if your glasses have an anti-reflective (AR) coating on them. The polarization and AR coating work together to block the glare from snow, as well as to let in light that allows you to see more clearly.

If you do a lot of winter driving, a quality pair of sunglasses is definitely worth the investment. They will protect your vision all winter long. Just make sure that the ones that you choose are polarized, and work well with your prescription. Talk to people like The Eyeglass Factory for more information.

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How To Avoid Injuries When Running On A Treadmill

Many runners hate logging miles on the “dreadmill,” but alas, this training tool does have a deserved place of value in the running world. It’s an excellent alternative to slogging through two feet of snow int the winter, and it also enables parents to fit in their runs without having to find babysitters.

If you’re thinking of moving some or all of your runs indoors to the treadmill, it’s important to be aware of the ways in which treadmill running can contribute to injuries, so you can take the proper precautions. Here are a few tips to keep your legs healthy as you log those treadmill miles.

Switch over to the treadmill gradually.

Many runners’ strides are slightly different on the treadmill than when outdoors. Some runners run with a shorter stride on the treadmill, while others tend to stretch their legs out more on the treadmill because they’re more conscious of their pace. Either way, switching from road running to treadmill running too quickly could leave you prone to injuries, since this change in stride puts stress on your joints in a different way.

To avoid muscle strains and joint injuries, switch over to the treadmill slowly. Start by doing just one run per week on the treadmill, and then replace one additional outdoor run per week with a treadmill run until you’re running inside on your desired number of days.

Remember to replace your shoes every 300–500 miles.

When you log most of your miles in on a clean treadmill, your shoes don’t look worn out as quickly as when you’ve been puddle hopping trails in them. However, the soles are still becoming more compacted with every run you take. Running on old shoes that have lost their padding makes you more prone to injury, since your joints are left to absorb more of the shock. Keep track of the miles you put on your shoes, and replace them every 300–500 miles, even if they still look like new.

Vary your pace and incline often.

When you run outside, your pace naturally changes throughout the run, and you’re probably not running on a completely flat surface the whole time, either. This variation helps protect against injury, since changing the pace or incline slightly alleviates pressure on certain muscles while letting others do the brunt of the labor for a while.

When many runners use a treadmill, on the other hand, they set it to a single pace and slog away at that pace for their entire workout. This is tougher on your legs and should be avoided. Vary your pace throughout your workout, and include a few “hills” in each run, too. You’ll find that you’re less sore and suffer from fewer injuries as a result.

Whether you plan on running every workout on the treadmill or only using it occasionally on the coldest days, it’s important to keep the tips above in mind. For more information on avoiding or treating foot or ankle pain, contact local experts such as Dynamic Physiotherapy.

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What To Expect The First Few Days After Getting Braces

If you’re looking at getting braces, you’ve more than likely been well-informed of the process from your orthodontist. Getting braces will be an exciting moment in your life where you know you are taking the necessary steps to correct your teeth, but this won’t take from the anxiety of not knowing what to expect during the healing and adjustment process. This article will help you prepare for the first days after you have them put on so you know just what to expect.

Day one

The first day you get your braces on you will have an odd sensation in your mouth. Having something new in your mouth constantly will cause you to experience a slight frustration and it will lead you to have the desire to rub your tongue and lips against the braces, avoid doing this as it will lead to more tenderness and sores. You won’t experience too much discomfort of pain on the first day.

Day two and three

Days two and three are going to pose the biggest hurdles when you get your braces on. These are the days when you will experience the most discomfort. The rubbing of the braces against the inside of your mouth can cause soreness and irritation. Most people don’t have an extreme amount of soreness; it’s generally something that can be relieved with an over-the-counter pain reliever. Eating can be challenging the first few days; your orthodontist will give you information on what foods you should eat.

Day four

By the fourth day you’ll notice the irritation is almost gone and you’re getting used to having the braces on your teeth. If you’re still having a difficult time at this point, you should make an appointment with your orthodontist to double check the braces.

The development of sores

When your braces rub against the inside of your mouth and your tongue, you may develop sores. The best way to prevent this, or cause the sores to quickly go away, is to use orthodontic wax. This is a wax you put on your braces in the areas you find rubbing against your mouth. The wax will prevent further rubbing and allow the sores to quickly heal on their own.

Once you know what to expect you’ll feel much better going in to get your braces on. The little amount of discomfort you may experience will be well worth it to get your teeth aligned properly where they will function better and look great. Talk to your orthodontist, such as Dr. Mar, for more information.

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Finding The Right Memory Care Facility For A Senior Relative

If you have a senior relative that is in need of memory care due to Alzheimer’s or dementia, then you may be considering letting them live in a memory care facility. In order to choose the best memory care facility for your relative you will need to do a thorough investigation of any facility that you are considering. You will find that policy about the most basic aspects of this kind of care differs based on the facility. This is why it is wise to ask a lot of questions before making your final decision on a retirement home:

What kind of recreational therapy is provided?

Seniors who need memory care often benefit from recreational therapy to keep their minds engaged. If you are looking to find memory care for a relative with Alzheimer’s or dementia then it is often best to choose a facility that provides music therapy and art therapy as part of their basic program, since these activities will keep the mind active. Continued stimulation of the mind is essential for helping your relative stay mentally alert for as long as possible.

Is Reminiscence therapy provided?

Reminiscence therapy is essential for those who are suffering from Alzheimer’s or dementia, since it helps the senior to stay connected to the real world as long as possible. Any facility you choose for your relative should provide this kind of therapy in order to keep your relative’s mind connected to past and the life they have lived.

Reminiscence therapy should involve oral as well as written therapy. This means that your relative should be encouraged to talk about “the old days” or family members should sometimes be allowed to come in and assist with this kind of therapy, either by talking with the relative, reading from journals or showing their relative pictures. Check on the policy of the memory care facility and how much involvement they let relatives have in reminiscence therapy or even if they provide this service.

Are residents grouped by cognitive ability?

Seniors in memory care facilities often benefit from being allowed to interact with those who are on the same cognitive level as they are. While it can sometimes be beneficial for them to step outside their cognitive group, staying within their cognitive limits will often reduce the seniors frustration level and make them feel more at home in the memory care facility.

Cognitive grouping fosters friendships and this will help your relative adjust to the environment more quickly. Find out the policy of the facility on this issue before you admit your relative.

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